Category Archives: biology

Counting Your Chickens Before They’re Pecked

It started with a brief story in the New York Times about Luke Robitaille, a 13-year-old student from Euless, Texas, who won the Raytheon Mathcounts National Competition by correctly answering the following question: In a barn, 100 chicks sit peacefully … Continue reading

Posted in biology, computing, featured, mathematics, problems and puzzles, statistics | 8 Comments

Try a little tendrilness

I was in Florida for the New Horizons in Science briefings of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing. On my way home I took a detour to hike a few miles through the Green Swamp, west of Orlando. … Continue reading

Posted in biology, mathematics, photography | 1 Comment

Joshua Trees and Toothpicks

After the Joint Mathematics Meetings in San Diego last month, I took a day off for some botanical and mathematical tourism. I drove up to Joshua Tree National Park, in the high desert beyond the San Bernardino Mountains. The park’s … Continue reading

Posted in biology, mathematics, photography | 6 Comments

A square yard of idea

After a year’s absence, I am home again in the pages of American Scientist. I want to thank the six friends and colleagues who kept the Computing Science department going while I was away. Here are their articles: A Tisket, … Continue reading

Posted in biology | 1 Comment

A molecular millisecond

It was not quite a century ago that we got our first glimpse of molecules. William Lawrence Bragg, with a little help from his dad, figured out how to get molecules to sit still long enough for a portrait. First … Continue reading

Posted in biology | 2 Comments